HOF blog: A brotherhood

0

Pittsburgh will always be at home: For one thing, it was home. For the others it was a home away from home. It will forever be a home for everyone to always return to.

Five members of the Steelers organization will be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame this weekend, including Bill Cowher, Troy Polamalu and Donnie Shell as members of Class of 2020 on Saturday night and Alan Faneca as member of Class of 2021 on Sunday night, in addition to Bill Nunn, who was officially anchored in April.

And for all four of them, Pittsburgh is a special place, and the Steelers organization is their family.

“That’s one of the greatest things,” said Cowher, who grew up in Crafton, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Pittsburgh where I grew up, Crafton, to Canton. It wasn’t a direct shot. It was a lot on the road. The lessons I learned along the way. The joys and relationships that I was allowed to experience. The memories I was able to top it off, it was a hell of a grueling drive.

“Nobody is going to be like the Steelers Organization. It’s a very unique place. Their mystery is that they are doing things right for the right reasons. In this world of temptation that we live in to maximize opportunities, adhere to them.” Adhere to the basic values ​​and I respect that. ”

Shell arrived in Pittsburgh from South Carolina in 1974 and headed to a place he had never been before. It changed his life in a great way.

“It meant everything to me to play for the Steelers,” said Shell. “Coming to a remarkable organization as a young man, 21 years old, had many traditions. There were many good examples of the Rooneys family in the community. They did things right and things that had an impact on who I was I’m doing with my foundation today, I saw that at a young age and it inspired me to help others in need and they still do.

“If I could say something, it was a great place for me. It had a huge impact on me and a lot of different things. It made me the type of person I am now.”

For Faneca, playing for the Steelers meant not just playing for the fans and the city, but playing for the family – his Steelers family.

“Playing for the Steelers was like playing for your family and with your brothers,” Faneca said. “When I left, a lot of people always wanted to know what the secrets are about what’s going on in Pittsburgh because everyone wants to recreate it. The consistency, the Super Bowl trophies. It’s really hard to put into words, but it’s a brotherhood, it’s a family, it’s the guys in the organization and it’s the dressing room We’re all so alike, but we’re all from different backgrounds.

“We were close, we were friends, everyone in the locker room was like that. That’s how you get through all the tough spots and that’s how you get a Pittsburgh Steelers team that should have maybe 6 or 7 wins on paper,” 8, 9 or 10. Because many teams in the NFL lack that and those things and qualities that carry over and carry over to the field. Sometimes people understood me, but most of the time they still haven’t and that is their loss. “


Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.